Cropping & Water Systems

 

Population growth puts a greater stress on expanding yields for food, which still encouraging resource stewardship. To help meet this challenge, we share unbiased, research‐based information for a diversified agricultural audience.

Active in all 93 counties and at extension.unl.edu/croppingwater

Cropping & Water Systems

Having a written agreement can help reduce miscommunication and frustration down the road.
• It ensures a better understanding by both parties.
• It serves as a reminder of the terms originally agreed upon.
• It increases the likelihood that the relationship will continue in future years.

When it comes to rental agreements for grazing corn residue, a number of questions need to be asked and answered up front to avoid disagreements later.

1. What is the latest start date that residue will be available for grazing?

This week the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service released its county level statistics on cash rental rates for irrigated and non-irrigated cropland and pastureland. Available in table and map form (Figures 1-3), the Nebraska rates are based on a random sample of nearly 16,000 producers who were surveyed from March through June.

Click here for the complete article.

Ongoing drought conditions are supporting hay and forage prices. While eastern parts of Nebraska had a good first cutting of hay, subsequent cuttings have been less. Areas further west haven't fared so well. Sandhills meadows will likely average less production than last year and yields will be below long term averages. Annual forages harvested for hay will be down as well due to lack of moisture in June and July.

Having a written agreement can help reduce miscommunication and frustration down the road.
• It ensures a better understanding by both parties.
• It serves as a reminder of the terms originally agreed upon.
• It increases the likelihood that the relationship will continue in future years.

When it comes to rental agreements for grazing corn residue, a number of questions need to be asked and answered up front to avoid disagreements later.

               Will you chop corn silage this year?  Do it right and time your harvest correctly.

                High-quality corn silage often is an economical substitute for some of the grain in finishing and in dairy rations.  And corn silage can be an important winter feed for cow-calf producers.  All too often, though, we fail to harvest silage to get its best feed value.

Warmer than normal mid-April temperatures have allowed corn planting to jump ahead of the five-year average (11%) with 17% of acres planted and 1% emerged as of April 23.  Since then farmers in some areas have completed or nearly completed planting. Early-planted corn has emerged in some parts of the state.