Local Interest

This year the National Garden Bureau features Lantana as its annual flower of the year. In the 18th century, lantana was a popular greenhouse plant in Europe and breeding efforts were extensive, resulting in hundreds of available selections. The most commonly available species, Lantana camara, is a tender plant winter hardy to zone 8. Although lantana is not winterhardy in Nebraska, it makes a tough, colorful summer annual for containers or ground beds.
Information was presented for landlords and operators on the latest cash rental rates, leasing considerations and trends, negotiation methods and farm succession. This workshop was developed by Extension Educators Austin Duerfeldt, Jim Jansen and Allan Vyhnalek, all in the Department of Agricultural Economics.
Colostrum is the "first milk" produced after calving. It has a different composition than milk as it has an important role in being the first meal a calf receives. Colostrum is more nutrient dense than milk and contains antibodies essential for calf health.

Nebraska Extension-Knox County will host a Beef Producer Update at the Knox County Extension office in Center on Wednesday, February 19th and the Madison County Extension office in Norfolk on Friday, February 21st. Both locations will begin at 1:30 p.m.

Focusing on winter herd management, the event will provide producers information on moisture impacts on hay and how to best utilize damaged bales, body condition scoring, and utilizing cover crops in fall/winter grazing systems.  Information provided will be of benefit to anyone involved in the competitive industry of beef production.  

Many people enjoy growing houseplants, watching them grow or bloom. According to WebMD, the following benefits are a few of those provided by houseplants.

Hay put up too wet can lead to a number of issues, most notably mold and heat.  Moisture keep otherwise dormant microbes and fungi active, decreasing forage quality and creating heat.  Too much heat can actually create a risk of combustion.

However, even heat that doesn’t get to the level of combustion can start to cause issues with our hay.  Since hay is not protected from oxygen like most of our anaerobic fermented feed stuffs (silage, haylage, etc.)  high temperatures, moisture, and oxygen allow  aerobic bacteria to grow, using plant protein and sugars for growth and producing carbon dioxide, water, and heat. Too much of this and temperatures can rise high enough to kick off a process called the Maillard reaction.

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Nebraska Extension in Knox County

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Nebraska Extension offers crop scout training in March

February 13, 2020

Lincoln, Neb. —Agricultural industry representatives and corn and soybean growers wanting to learn how to better manage corn and soybean pests should plan to attend the Nebraska Extension Crop Scout Training for Pest Managers on March 11. The workshop will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center near Mead. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.

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Farm bill program enrollment video resources available

February 11, 2020
The Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has published video resources on farm bill details and decisions for producers as the March 15 deadline for new program enrollment decision approaches.

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