Horticulture, Landscape, and Environmental Systems

 

Extension is committed to helping Nebraskans know more about creating resource- and energy-efficient rural and urban landscapes, protecting and managing water resources, properly managing insect and wildlife pests, and more.

Active in all 93 counties and at communityenvironment.unl.edu

Horticulture, Landscape, and Environmental Systems

By Jeanne Murray, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Are you planning to can some of your garden produce? 

Garden produce can be preserved by two canning methods, the water-bath or the pressure canner. Water-bath canning is for produce with high acidity, like pickles, most fruits, sauerkraut, tomatoes, jams and jellies. The pressure canner is used for low-acid foods, like vegetables, meats, sea foods and salsas without added acid. Improperly canned produce may result in a deadly food poisoning.

By Elaine Pile, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Drought Tolerant Plants

As we once again are experiencing drought this year, we need to consider drought tolerant plants. These plants will persist for three or more years with little or no supplemental watering, and help conserve water, reduce water maintenance and still provide multi-season color and interest. They do best in full sun and well-drained soil. Areas that are difficult to water or are subject to reflected heat and light are good locations for drought-tolerant perennials. 

By Leann Sato, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Lawn Down and Brown?

That’s okay, let it rest. Grass protects itself from scorching heat by going dormant. Let it rest during summer’s heat and revive when Fall’s cooler temperatures arrive. A half inch of water about every two to three weeks will keep the crowns and roots healthy. Native, drought-resistant grass varieties, like buffalo and blue grama, will require less water during dormancy than cool season grasses. Save water and let the lawn rest until Fall.

By Elaine Pile, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Drifting Pesticides

By Laurie Zitterkopf, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

How to Prepare to Show Your Flowers and Vegetables at the Fair!

By Jeanne Murray, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

What kind of garlic do you grow? 

There are two kinds of garlic - the softneck garlic and the hardneck garlic. Hardneck is the one found here in our northern climate. The hardneck has a hard central stem with the cloves clustered about the base of the stem. This stem curls and forms a seed pod in June which needs to be removed upon its appearance. More about the garlic tomorrow.

When do you harvest garlic?