Local Interest

The Returning to the Farm workshop series is being taught for families that have the next generation of farmers and ranchers coming back to their operations.  The workshop helps multi-generations traverse the challenges of successfully succeeding the operation to the next generation. 

Presenters will include Nebraska Extension experts, agribusiness and legal professionals.  

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County (Week of October 25, 2021)

If you are a creature of tidiness, here is a thought to ponder. Cutting back the foliage of flowering perennials, ornamental grasses, and small shrubs is damaging to native bees that overwinter in the hollow stems of plants.  Moisture seeps down through the open ends, killing the eggs, larvae, and pupae of native bees that are set to emerge as adult bees come spring.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension in Dodge County (Week of October 11, 2021)

This is the time of year when fungi become the topic of conversation. What most people find alarming is the speed with which conks, mushrooms, and puffballs develop. In some cases, it is literally overnight. What is visible are the sporulating structures—the part of fungi that produces the next generation.  A good way to think of this is plants make seeds to produce the next generation, fungi produce spores. These spore-producing structures are varied and fascinating, and most people who ask about them are wanting to eat them.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County (Week of October 4, 2021)

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County (Week of September 27, 2021)

As harvest from the vegetable garden draws to a close, it is time to plan and take steps to protect the soil for the winter months ahead. This ensures the soil is in good shape and ready for next year’s garden. After all, soil isn’t just dirt, but a rich and varied composition of minerals and plant nutrients, organic matter, beneficial microorganisms, and humic acid.  It is not only foundational, with spaces for roots to grow and anchor plants, but also serving up a nourishing “stew” for seed germination, plant growth and vegetable production.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County (Week of September 20, 2021)

Snails and slugs are noted for their voracious appetites, eating holes in the leaves of hosta (their preferred food) but also munching on roses, ferns, impatiens, begonias, and fruits, including strawberries and tomatoes. You may not see the actual snails and slugs themselves since they prefer to feed at night or on cloudy days, but if you see holes AND their silvery slime trails, these guys are making themselves at home. Typically, snails and slugs prefer to slime their way to the center of leaves where they will eat holes between leaf veins. Sometimes they eat their way inward from leaf edges.

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Students undertake surgery, flight, and more at Incredible STEM Day

February 8, 2024
Fifth graders flooded the halls of the Panhandle Research Extension and Education Center in Scottsbluff on Feb. 7, when the Nebraska Extension held its second annual Incredible STEM Day.

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Geoscientist uses sensors to assess potential damage in dams

February 8, 2024
Water can be a life-giving source and a destructive one.

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University saluted by Carnegie Foundation for excellence in community engagement

January 11, 2024

“We see the designation as a springboard. It allows us to ramp up in places where we can do better, to bring more public presence to the engagement work that we’re doing, to reward those people who are doing it well and to really enhance our capacity in engagement.”Kathleen Lodl, associate dean of Nebraska Extension

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Local cattleman honored with ‘Outstanding Service to Panhandle Agriculture’ award

January 9, 2024

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Panhandle Research Extension and Education Center in Scottsbluff held its Holiday Banquet with faculty and staff on Jan. 5 at the Weborg Center in Gering. 

The annual PREEC award for Outstanding Service to Panhandle Agriculture was awarded to Dr. Ivan Rush, an Emeritus Professor of Beef Nutrition at the Panhandle Research & Extension Center.

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