Population growth puts a greater stress on expanding yields for food, which still encouraging resource stewardship. To help meet this challenge, we share unbiased, research‐based information for a diversified agricultural audience.

Active in all 93 counties and at extension.unl.edu/croppingwater

Cropping & Water Systems

Part 5 of a series about basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource. Water law can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West. When conflicts arise, courts usually determine the outcome, unless there are state or federal laws or previous case studies to resolve the issue. Exceptions to the law can arise from differences in each state’s water laws.

Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension Educator Water and Integrated Cropping Systems 

Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension Educator    Water and Integrated Cropping Systems

Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension Educator Water and Integrated Cropping Systems

This is the second in a six-part series of articles covering basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource. Water law has a long history. It can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West. 

Each spring, as the planting season approaches, brings fresh questions about irrigation water:

How much water will the mountain snowpack provide to the North Platte Valley? What’s the state of the irrigation infrastructure in the valley? What have we learned about the system in the past year? How does the complex system of dams, diversions, checks and canals work? Will groundwater irrigation regulations stay the same as last year?

Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension Educator Water and Integrated Cropping Systems

This the first in a six-part series of articles covering basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource.

Water law has a long history. It can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West.