Horticulture, Landscape, and Environmental Systems

 

Extension is committed to helping Nebraskans know more about creating resource- and energy-efficient rural and urban landscapes, protecting and managing water resources, properly managing insect and wildlife pests, and more.

Active in all 93 counties and at communityenvironment.unl.edu

Horticulture, Landscape, and Environmental Systems

By Kirstee Schutte, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener  

Nematodes

By Laurie Zitterkopf, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Conserve Water, Plant Native Plants

The water we put on our lawns is equal to thirty-two gallons of water every day for every man, woman and child in the country. Because this is more water than is replaced by rainfall in most areas of the country, watering our lawns is clearly an unsustainable practice. Why do we have lawns, our neighbor has one?  If we plant native plants, once established they need little to no additional water.

Starting a New Perennial Bed

By Emily Stine, Extension Educator & Panhandle Master Gardener Coordinator

What is the Nebraska Master Gardener Program?

The Nebraska Master Gardener Program provides science-based horticulture education to volunteers. Participants complete 40 hours of training in integrated pest management, weeds, insects, plant selection, soil fertility and other related topics. 40 hours of volunteer service in the first year completes the certification. For more information visit mastergardener.unl.edu.

By Jeanne Yeoman, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

By Jeanne Murray, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Are you planning to can some of your garden produce? 

Garden produce can be preserved by two canning methods, the water-bath or the pressure canner. Water-bath canning is for produce with high acidity, like pickles, most fruits, sauerkraut, tomatoes, jams and jellies. The pressure canner is used for low-acid foods, like vegetables, meats, sea foods and salsas without added acid. Improperly canned produce may result in a deadly food poisoning.

By Elaine Pile, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Drought Tolerant Plants

As we once again are experiencing drought this year, we need to consider drought tolerant plants. These plants will persist for three or more years with little or no supplemental watering, and help conserve water, reduce water maintenance and still provide multi-season color and interest. They do best in full sun and well-drained soil. Areas that are difficult to water or are subject to reflected heat and light are good locations for drought-tolerant perennials.