Local Interest

Freezing Milk

While pasteurized milk can be frozen, it may separate or be slightly grainy when thawed. Frozen milk works best for cooking, but you may find it's still okay for drinking. Freeze milk in small containers and leave some extra space at the top since milk expands during freezing. Plan to use frozen milk within a month for best quality. Thaw milk in the refrigerator. During thawing, the fat in milk may separate from the water in milk – stir or shake well before using.

Freezing Cheese

Hard or semi-hard cheese can be frozen if cut in 1/2 to 1-pound blocks. Wrap in plastic wrap and then put in freezer bags. After freezing, cheese may become crumbly and mealy, but it will retain its flavor.

This year the National Garden Bureau features Lantana as its annual flower of the year. In the 18th century, lantana was a popular greenhouse plant in Europe and breeding efforts were extensive, resulting in hundreds of available selections. The most commonly available species, Lantana camara, is a tender plant winter hardy to zone 8. Although lantana is not winterhardy in Nebraska, it makes a tough, colorful summer annual for containers or ground beds.
Information was presented for landlords and operators on the latest cash rental rates, leasing considerations and trends, negotiation methods and farm succession. This workshop was developed by Extension Educators Austin Duerfeldt, Jim Jansen and Allan Vyhnalek, all in the Department of Agricultural Economics.
Colostrum is the "first milk" produced after calving. It has a different composition than milk as it has an important role in being the first meal a calf receives. Colostrum is more nutrient dense than milk and contains antibodies essential for calf health.
Many people enjoy growing houseplants, watching them grow or bloom. According to WebMD, the following benefits are a few of those provided by houseplants.

Hay put up too wet can lead to a number of issues, most notably mold and heat.  Moisture keep otherwise dormant microbes and fungi active, decreasing forage quality and creating heat.  Too much heat can actually create a risk of combustion.

However, even heat that doesn’t get to the level of combustion can start to cause issues with our hay.  Since hay is not protected from oxygen like most of our anaerobic fermented feed stuffs (silage, haylage, etc.)  high temperatures, moisture, and oxygen allow  aerobic bacteria to grow, using plant protein and sugars for growth and producing carbon dioxide, water, and heat. Too much of this and temperatures can rise high enough to kick off a process called the Maillard reaction.

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Estimated Crop Water Use

May 16, 2022
The estimated crop water use for Nebraska Panhandle crops for the previous week and the upcoming week is shown in this table. It is based on data gathered by and calculations made by Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension educator, and Dr. Xin Qiao, Extension Irrigation and Water Management Specialist, both based at the UNL Panhandle Research and Extension Center in Scottsbluff.

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Agsplosion brings agriculture to local students

May 16, 2022
More than 700 elementary students from western Nebraska got a hands-on education recently about Nebraska agriculture during the Agsplosion event that was held in 5 different locations in the Panhandle.

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Master Gardener tips for the Panhandle – Week of May 16, 2022

May 15, 2022
Are you looking for agricultural information that you can trust? Look no further than University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension publications!

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Two Record Keeping Workshops Offered in Rushville

May 10, 2022

Lincoln, Neb. —Keeping your records up to date on the farm or ranch is important but can be a complicated task. Nebraska Extension is offering two workshops in Rushville at the Sheridan County Extension Office (800 S Loofborrow Street) on May 23. These workshops will help you develop an easier process in keeping records by using tools, resources and tips taught during the sessions.

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