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Extension Marks 61 Years of Weed Guide with User Survey

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Wed, 05/05/2021 - 14:42
Figure 1: Weed Guide customers across the USA (data from UNL Marketplace, 2019). (Photo by Stevan Knezevic)

Track Stripe and Leaf Rust in Winter Wheat Across Nebraska

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Thu, 04/29/2021 - 15:35
Figure 1: Stripe rust (Photo by Nathan Mueller)

Water Law 101: Part 5, More Groundwater — Wells

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Thu, 04/29/2021 - 11:41
Furrow irrigation using gated pipe in a field of dry edible beans in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. Scotts Bluff National Monument is in the background. (Photo by Gary Stone)

Which 2,4-D Product Should I Use as a Burndown Before Planting Enlist E3® Soybean?

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Thu, 04/29/2021 - 10:50
When using a burndown herbicide to terminate broadleaf cover crops and weeds this spring, planting intervals often may negate the use of many 2,4-D products prior to Enlist E3® soybean planting. (Photos by Amit Jhala).

Can Cover Crops Offset the Negative Impacts of Corn Silage?

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Wed, 04/28/2021 - 17:09
Figure 1. Residue cover under high moisture corn (left) and corn silage (right) during soil sampling in late spring. Residue cover remaining on the soil surface from high moisture corn harvest helps to intercept the impact of raindrops, slow the speed of runoff, and protect the soil surface from erosion, unlike the visible signs of erosion in corn silage (right). Additionally, surface residue can contribute to soil nutrients, structure and infiltration, organic matter and feed for soil microbes.

Scout Wheat Fields for Early Disease Detection

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Wed, 04/28/2021 - 14:59
Figure 1. Wheat in research plots at Havelock Farm, Lancaster County, on April 27.

Scouting Advised for Alfalfa Weevil

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Wed, 04/28/2021 - 10:11
Figure 1. Adult and small- to medium-sized larvae of the alfalfa weevil. (Photo by Julie Peterson)

Where are your priorities and How does your operation stack-up to the competition (Benchmarking)?

Latest Updates from beef.unl.edu - Tue, 04/27/2021 - 16:38
Saturday, May 1, 2021

Benchmarking a cow-calf operation by comparing it to other similar operations, can give producers a tool to look at ways they can improve their business. This summary looked at 31 commercial beef cow-calf operations with 100 or more cows. The information comes from the 2019 FINBIN database maintained by the University of Minnesota for the states of Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

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Range and Pasture Weed of the Week – Knapweed, Spotted and Diffuse

Latest Updates from beef.unl.edu - Tue, 04/27/2021 - 15:42
Saturday, May 1, 2021

This article is a summary of Nebraska Extension Circular EC 173, Noxious Weeds of Nebraska Spotted and Diffuse Knapweed and the Extension Circular EC130, 2021 Guide for Weed, Disease, and Insect Management in Nebraska.

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Pasture and Forage Minute: The Right Stocking Rate

Latest Updates from beef.unl.edu - Tue, 04/27/2021 - 15:21
Saturday, May 1, 2021

Stocking pastures with the right number of animals is one of the cornerstones of proper grazing management.  It’s tempting to take the easy route and keep using the same rate year after year.  After all, if it’s not broke, why fix it?  But over time, could this approach do more harm than good? 

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Pasture and Forage Minute: Spring Turn-Out to Pastures

Latest Updates from beef.unl.edu - Tue, 04/27/2021 - 15:14
Saturday, May 1, 2021

The time for turn-out to our primary summer pastures is coming soon.  A couple of important questions are what date to turn-out, and which pastures should be first?

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Pasture and Forage Minute: Spring Turn-out Strategies, Seedbed Preparation and Grazing Reed Canarygrass

Latest Updates from cropwatch.unl.edu - Tue, 04/27/2021 - 14:20
If turned out early enough, cattle will successfully graze reed canarygrass, which is very nutritional at a young growth stage (less than 10 inches tall).

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