Local Interest

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

 The flooding and subsequent ponding has a profound effect on trees and shrubs in the landscape. The contaminants these waters carry negatively impact vegetable garden sites and orchards.  Here are some flood resources to address residents’ concerns.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Assistant Educator

 The 2019 spring flood has had a devastating impact for all parts of the landscape, including trees.  While the extent of the damage to trees may not be realized for years, how and if trees survive depend on several factors.

 ▪Certainly that the floods came when the trees were dormant is a factor in their favor. Flooding is always hardest on actively growing trees.

What Kills Trees

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Assistant Educator

 Trees in native undisturbed sites live, on average, to be about 150 years old.  Downtown trees have a life expectancy of 7-17 years; suburban trees 30-40 years; and rural trees 60-70 years.  Why is there such a difference in life expectancy between trees in native sites than those in disturbed sites? Certainly there are acute factors, like hail, herbicide drift and insect infestations that can kill trees but the chronic issues overwhelmingly pre-dispose trees to shortened lifespans.

Stanton County is following State Fair guidelines for ID'ing sheep and goats.

From State Fair Book:

All market lambs, breeding sheep, market and breeding goats to be shown at State Fair must be tagged with a USDA official scrapie ID, owned by the exhibitor, have completed the online nomination entry.

 Here is what this means for you:

You will need to get your own USDA official scrapie ID to tag your animals. Info attached. Scrapie ID number paperwork will need to be turned in to the office to be kept on file. You will need to complete ID sheets and turn them into the office.

 Deadline – June 3.

Information and links to Livestock Resources are located under the Stanton County 4-H tab at the top of the page. Information includes:

Scrapie Tag Information for Sheep & Goat Exhibitors Animal Identification Guidelines Youth for the Quality Care of Animals (YQCA) Veterinary Feed Directive Premises ID Animal ID Sheets

What is Nebraska Extension ProHort Education?

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Assistant Educator

 

ProHort, short for Professional Horticulture, is research-driven education for individuals in the tree, lawn, landscape maintenance, and garden center industries, as well as anyone who wants to hone her/his skills in the areas of botany, insects, soils, landscape design, plant disease, trees, wildlife damage management, turfgrass, and Integrated Pest Management (IPM). While people participating in ProHort education train right alongside Nebraska Extension Master Gardeners, there is no volunteer component associated with ProHort education nor do people have to apply to participate.

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Nebraska Extension in Stanton County

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Nebraska Extension showcasing 4-H’ers at county fairs

May 22, 2020
Nebraska Extension is working to make sure all 4-H’ers across the state have the opportunity to showcase their hard work come county fair time this summer.

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Nebraska Extension, UNMC to host discussion on impact of pandemic-related stress on farmers and ranchers

May 22, 2020
Nebraska Extension and the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Rural Health Initiative will host a discussion about the impact of COVID-related stress on farmers, ranchers and others engaged in agriculture.

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