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Updated: 55 min 43 sec ago

Physical Activity with a Newborn

10 hours 54 min ago

How to Safely Roast a Turkey Video

Fri, 11/18/2022 - 09:34

How to Thaw a Turkey

Mon, 11/14/2022 - 11:51

Crunchy Kohlrabi Salad

Mon, 11/07/2022 - 16:55
Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 kohlrabi (2 cups), scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, peeled, and cut into matchsticks
  • 1 apple, gently rubbed under running water, cored, and cut into matchsticks
  • ¼ cup dried cranberries or raisins
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 Tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon mustard (Dijon or other)
  • Salt and pepper to taste (optional)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Wash and prepare kohlrabi and apple.
  3. In a large bowl, combine kohlrabi, apple, dried cranberries, and sunflower seeds.
  4. To make the dressing, combine vinegar, vegetable oil, maple syrup, mustard, salt and pepper (if desired) in a small bowl until well combined.
  5. Add dressing to salad and toss.
  6. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Salads Yield: 6 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 110Total Fat: 5Saturated Fat: 0.5Potassium: 6Total Sugars: 11Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 2Protein: 2Fiber: 3Added Sugars: 5Total Carbohydrates: 15Sodium: 60Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Roasted Parmesan Rutabaga Fries

Mon, 11/07/2022 - 16:42
Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNewsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium rutabagas, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, peeled
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 Tablespoon Italian seasoning
  • 1 Tablespoon Parmesan cheese, grated

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Preheat oven to 425⁰F. Spray a large baking sheet with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside.
  3. Cut rutabagas into 1/4-inch thick wedges.
  4. Place rutabaga wedges in a large bowl. Drizzle with oil and sprinkle with garlic and Italian seasoning. Toss to coat evenly.
  5. Spread the rutabaga wedges in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes or until they start to brown. Flip the wedges over and bake for another 10-15 minutes or until the wedges are soft on the inside and well-browned, cooked through, and crispy on the outside.
  7. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve immediately.
  8. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Side Dishes Yield: 4 servings Serving Size: 1 cupCalories: 110Total Fat: 4Saturated Fat: 1Potassium: 15Total Sugars: 9Iron: 6Calcium: 10Protein: 3Fiber: 5Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 18Sodium: 50Cholesterol: 0Vitamin A: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Oven-Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

Mon, 11/07/2022 - 16:32
Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNotes: 

*Green tomatoes can be used in place of tomatillos.
**For less spicy salsa, remove the seeds from the jalapeño.

Alternatively to the oven roasting method, tomatillos can also be toasted on the stovetop. Place husked and washed whole tomatillos in a large pan and toast over medium-high heat until skins brown and tomatillos soften.

Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fresh tomatillos, husked, gently rubbed under running water*
  • 2 jalapeños, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water**
  • 3 cloves garlic OR 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ cup onion, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, gently rubbed under cold running water (optional)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Set your oven to broil. Spray a large baking sheet with non-stick cooking spray.
  3. Remove husks from the tomatillos. Rinse with water and dry with a clean towel or paper towel.
  4. Cut tomatillos and jalapeños in half. Place cut side down on the prepared baking sheet. If using garlic cloves, place these on the tray to roast as well.
  5. Roast in the oven for 8 minutes, or until the tomatillo and jalapeño skins start to blacken.
  6. Remove the tray from the oven, and let cool for 10 minutes.
  7. Place roasted vegetables in a blender. Add chopped onions, lime juice, salt, and cilantro if desired. Blend until all the ingredients are finely chopped and mixed.
  8. Serve with tortilla chips, tacos, burritos, meat, chicken, or fish.
  9. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Appetizers Snacks Yield: 6 servings Serving Size: 1/4 cupCalories: 30Total Fat: 1Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 6Total Sugars: 4Iron: 6Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 0Protein: 1Fiber: 2Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 6Sodium: 0Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Freezing Eggs

Thu, 11/03/2022 - 15:44

Pickling Eggs

Wed, 11/02/2022 - 15:07

Spooky Veggies and Dip

Tue, 10/25/2022 - 14:36

Involving children in preparing meals is a great way to teach them food preparation skills and the importance of healthy eating. This platter is a fun way to get kids involved and a great item to bring to Halloween parties and events. Be creative and use any vegetables you have on hand.

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food Processorhttps://food.unl.edu/recipes/documents/spooky-veggies-and-dip-nep.pdfAuthor:  Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup plain non-fat yogurt
  • ½ cup non-fat sour cream
  • ⅛ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon dried parsley OR ½ Tablespoon fresh parsley
  • ½ teaspoon dried dill OR ½ Tablespoon fresh dill
  • ⅛ teaspoon pepper
  • 2 cups fresh vegetables (cucumbers, peppers, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, olives, snap peas)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. If using fresh herbs, wash them by gently rubbing them under cold running water. Pat dry with a paper towel, then finely chop.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine all the dip ingredients (yogurt, sour cream, garlic powder, onion powder, parsley, dill and pepper). Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
  4. Scrub vegetables with clean vegetable brush under running water. Slice into desirable shapes.
  5. To serve, place ranch dip in a small cup for the skeleton's head.
  6. Assemble vegetables in the shape of a skeleton. For example, use carrots and celery to make arms and legs, sliced pepper for the rib cage, cucumber for the spine, and herbs or lettuce for hair.
  7. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Appetizers Snacks Yield: 4 servings Serving Size: 1/4 of recipeCalories: 70Total Fat: 0Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 6Total Sugars: 5Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 10Protein: 4Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 13Sodium: 95Cholesterol: 5Photo by Marusa Jonas

Holiday Wellness Tips

Tue, 10/25/2022 - 09:42

Elote Salad (Mexican Street Corn Salad)

Mon, 10/24/2022 - 14:38

Elote, meaning corn in Spanish, is also a name of a popular Mexican street food staple. The main ingredient is cooked corn on the cob, traditionally coated in mayonnaise, rolled in Cotija cheese, and sprinkled with ancho chili powder. Try this modified salad version to experience the delicious flavor combinations.

 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNotes: 

*Three cups of canned or frozen corn can be used instead of fresh corn.
**For a spicier salad, ancho chili powder, chipotle chili powder or cayenne pepper can be used.

https://food.unl.edu/recipes/documents/elote-salad-nep.pdfAuthor:  Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 4 ears of corn, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, cut from the cob*
  • 1 jalapeno, gently rubbed under cold running water, seeds removed, diced
  • ¼ cup onion, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, diced
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, gently rubbed under running water, diced
  • ¼ cup non-fat sour cream
  • ¼ cup Cotija cheese, crumbled
  • 1 Tablespoon lime juice
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder**

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. n a large skillet, heat oil over high heat. Add corn and cook while occasionally stirring for 5 minutes, or until slightly charred. Transfer to a large bowl and let it cool.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients to the corn and stir until combined.
  4. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
  5. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Salads Side Dishes Yield: 8 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 60Total Fat: 2Saturated Fat: 1Potassium: 2Total Sugars: 1Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 4Protein: 2Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 9Sodium: 70Cholesterol: 5Photo by Marusa Jonas

Jajic (Middle Eastern Cucumber Salad)

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 13:58

Jajic is a popular cucumber yogurt salad, widely prepared in Middle Eastern countries. It is very similar to yogurt-based salads or dips such as cacik, tzatziki, or raita. It is often served with rice and grilled meat dishes.

Source:

This recipe was created in collaboration with Community Crops and Yazidi Project. 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNotes: 

*To serve the salad as a dip, grate cucumbers instead of chopping. 
**Substitute or add more fresh herbs to taste, such as parsley, cilantro, or chives. 

 

Author:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 3-5 Persian cucumbers OR 1 large cucumber, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped*
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh mint, gently rubbed under running water, finely chopped OR 2 teaspoons dried mint
  • ¼ cup fresh dill, gently rubbed under running water, finely chopped*
  • 1 cup plain non-fat greek yogurt
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Combine all ingredients in a medium sized bowl. Refrigerate until serving.
  3. Serve chilled with meat and fish dishes, or as a dip with pita bread.
  4. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Salads Side Dishes Yield: 6 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 30Total Fat: 0Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 2Total Sugars: 2Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 4Protein: 4Fiber: 0Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 4Sodium: 15Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Zalata (Middle Eastern Salad)

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 13:51

Zalata, meaning salad in Assyrian, is a Middle Eastern salad that is typically made with Persian cucumbers, white onion, and fresh herbs. The salad is served as an appetizer or a side dish.

Source:

This recipe was created in collaboration with Community Crops and Yazidi Project. 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorAuthor:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium tomatoes, gently rubbed under running water, chopped
  • 3-5 Persian cucumbers OR 1 large cucumber, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • ½ onion, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh parsley, gently rubbed under running water, finely chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh mint, gently rubbed under running water, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ⅓ cup fresh lemon juice (1-2 lemons)
  • ½ teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. In a large bowl, combine tomatoes, cucumber, onion, parsley, and mint.
  3. In a separate small bowl, combine garlic, lemon juice, and salt (if desired).
  4. Pour lemon juice mixture over vegetables. Mix well.
  5. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Salads Side Dishes Yield: 8 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 15Total Fat: 0Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 2Total Sugars: 2Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 2Protein: 1Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 4Sodium: 0Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Quick Pickled Turnips and Beets

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 13:40

Pink pickled turnips are a staple condiment in the Middle East, often served with appetizer platters or alongside dishes such as hummus, flatbread, falafel, and kebabs. The secret to a pretty pink hue is the red beet which turns the white turnips into varying shades of pink.

Source:

This recipe was created in collaboration with Community Crops and Yazidi Project. 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorAuthor:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound turnips, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, cut into ¼-inch thick sticks
  • 1 medium beet, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, cut into ¼-inch thick sticks
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • ⅓ cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Place turnips and beets in clean canning jars or a glass container with a tight-fitting lid.
  3. In a medium saucepan, combine apple cider vinegar, water, honey, and salt. Bring to a boil. Carefully pour the liquid into the jars, making sure to completely cover the turnips and beets.
  4. Close the jar tightly and let sit at room temperature to cool, for about one hour, before transferring to the refrigerator.
  5. Refrigerate overnight before serving.
  6. Serve with your favorite vegetable platter, on a salad, or on a sandwich.
  7. Store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to four weeks.
Category:  Salads Side Dishes Snacks Yield: 12 servings Serving Size: 1/3 cupCalories: 35Total Fat: 0Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 2Total Sugars: 9Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 0Protein: 0Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 8Total Carbohydrates: 10Sodium: 210Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Baharat Spiced Tilapia

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 12:05
Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNotes: 

Baharat is a widely used spice blend in Middle Eastern cuisine. It includes black pepper, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, cardamom, cinnamon, paprika, and cloves. Make your own blend by following this recipe.

Author:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 2 tilapia fillets or other white fish
  • 1 teaspoon Baharat spice mix*
  • ½ teaspoon salt (optional)
  • ½ Tablespoon vegetable oil

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Rub spice mix and salt (if desired) over both sides of the fish fillet.
  3. In a large skillet, heat oil. Lay the fish fillets in the skillet. Wash hands with soap and water after handling raw fish.
  4. Cook 3-4 minutes. Flip the fillets and cook for an additional 3-4 minutes. The fish will cook quickly. It is done when the internal temperature reaches 145⁰F when measured with a food thermometer.
  5. Serve with rice, couscous, salad, or other vegetable side dishes.
  6. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Main Dishes Yield: 2 servings Serving Size: 1 filetCalories: 150Total Fat: 6Saturated Fat: 1.5Potassium: 8Total Sugars: 0Iron: 6Vitamin D: 15Calcium: 2Protein: 23Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 1Sodium: 50Cholesterol: 50Photo by Marusa Jonas

Baharat (Middle Eastern Spice Blend)

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 11:44

Baharat is a widely used spice blend in Middle Eastern cuisine. The word baharat actually means “spices” in Arabic and varies slightly in ingredients, depending on where the spice blend is made. This spice mix has a deep, mildly sweet taste with a touch of smokiness. It is typically used to season meat, fish, soups, rice, beans, and vegetables. 

 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorAuthor:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 2 Tablespoons cumin seeds
  • 2 Tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 2 teaspoons whole cloves
  • 2 teaspoons cardamom seeds
  • 2 Tablespoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Heat a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add black peppercorns, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, whole cloves, and cardamom seeds. Toast for 3-5 minutes, or until fragrant, while stirring continuously to avoid burning.
  3. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool for five minutes.
  4. Combine with the rest of the spices and grind into a fine powder. You can use a spice or coffee grinder, blender, food processor, or mortar and pestle.
  5. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place for up to one year.
Category:  Main Dishes Side Dishes Yield: 20 servings Serving Size: 1 teaspoonCalories: 10Total Fat: 0Saturated Fat: 0Potassium: 2Total Sugars: 0Iron: 6Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 2Protein: 0Fiber: 1Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 2Sodium: 0Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas

Okra Stew (Marigha Bamia)

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 09:40

Bamia or bamiya is a Middle Eastern stew, traditionally made with okra and tomatoes. The dish is often cooked with chicken or lamb and served with rice or bread.

Source:

This recipe was adapted from yezidisinternational.org and was created in collaboration with Community Crops and Yazidi Project. 

 

Nutrition Software Used: ESHA Food ProcessorNotes: 

*Frozen okra can be used in place of fresh okra.

Author:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 6 Tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound fresh okra, gently rubbed under cold running water, chopped or whole*
  • 1 onion, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • 1 pound chicken breasts, skinless and boneless, cut into cubes
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons salt (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro, gently rubbed under cold running water, chopped and divided

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. In a large pot, heat three tablespoons of oil over medium heat. Add okra and onions. Cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Remove vegetables from the pot and set aside.
  4. Heat an additional 3 Tablespoons of olive oil in the same pot and add chicken. Wash hands after handling uncooked chicken. Cook for five minutes or until internal temperature reaches 165°F as measured with a food thermometer.
  5. Add garlic and cook for four minutes.
  6. Stir in cooked okra and onion, tomato sauce, water, salt (if desired), pepper, and half of the cilantro. Simmer for 15 minutes.
  7. Sprinkle with remaining cilantro and serve with bread or rice.
  8. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Main Dishes Yield: 16 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 110Total Fat: 6Saturated Fat: 1Potassium: 8Total Sugars: 3Iron: 6Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 2Protein: 8Fiber: 2Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 6Sodium: 210Cholesterol: 20Photo by Marusa Jonas

Sauteed Eggplant with Okra

Fri, 10/21/2022 - 09:25
Notes: 

This recipe was created in collaboration with Community Crops and Yazidi Project. 

Author:  Georgia Jones gjones2 Marusa Jonas mcernjul2 Newsletter/Program:  Nutrition Education Program Archive Link: https://food.unl.edu/nutrition-education-program-nepContact Info: Jean Ann FischerTaxonomy Term Description: 

The Nutrition Education Program (NEP) delivers evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions through a combination of education strategies coupled with multi-level community changes that occur within the environment to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles.

This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP and Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • 1 eggplant, scrubbed with clean vegetable brush under running water, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 8 okra, gently rubbed under cold running water, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, eggplant, and salt, if desired. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add okra and garlic. Cook while occasionally stirring for another 10 minutes, or until vegetables are tender.
  4. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to four days.
Category:  Side Dishes Yield: 8 servings Serving Size: 1/2 cupCalories: 80Total Fat: 5Saturated Fat: 0.5Potassium: 4Total Sugars: 3Iron: 0Vitamin D: 0Calcium: 2Protein: 1Fiber: 3Added Sugars: 0Total Carbohydrates: 7Sodium: 0Cholesterol: 0Photo by Marusa Jonas