Local Interest

By Jill A. Goedeken, Nebraska Extension 4-H Youth Development

While connecting in person may not be possible right now, maintaining positive social connections for youth is important for supporting their social and emotional well-being. These connections are critically important for all youth – those who appear to be doing okay with these uncertain times and for those who may be struggling. Certainly, everyone is experiencing the sudden disruptions in routines and being with friends.

During stressful times, the role of a caring adult is certainly important. Examples of caring adults include parents, extended family members, teachers, coaches, neighbors, and other mentors youth regularly interact with such as youth group leaders, 4-H club leaders, etc.

With virtual-learning, social distancing, and a long list of cancelled beloved pastimes, life can feel pretty far from what we once knew. Change is hard. Yet, amidst a time of uncertainty and change we are searching to find a new normal. A sense of stability, routine, and familiarity are important for youth. Parents, care-providers, and youth development professionals can help youth plan their day to reestablish routine. Having a daily routine enables youth to have some control and choice in their life which is important for their well-being.

Many households in Nebraska’s rural counties, especially in the Panhandle and Sandhills, are slow in responding to the 2020 Census, compared to those in more populous counties.

If that trend continues, parts of rural Nebraska could potentially lose a lot of dollars and growth opportunities over the next decade, according to several Nebraska Extension Community Vitality educators and specialists. They are encouraging rural Nebraskans to make sure they are counted in the 2020 Census.

By Dr. Michelle Krehbiel, Nebraska Extension 4-H Youth Development

“I don’t like this!”

Children or youth might say this during a heated game, when being asked to correct unwanted behavior or when plans change. Young people who were looking forward to milestones like field days, end of school year celebrations, prom, or graduation, have reason to believe that life can be sad, frustrating, and difficult. How can nurturing adults help young people cope with these emotions and equip them with the skills they need to be caring, connected, and capable adults?

Here is the weekly crop of Master Gardener tips from Nebraska Extension in the Panhandle. These tips are relevant to local lawn and garden issues in the High Plains and follow research-based recommendations. This week’s tips come from Britni Schmaltz, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener Volunteer.

Planting dates: Have you caught spring fever? Each winter, most gardeners eagerly look forward to getting back in the garden and sprucing up their landscape. Don’t get too ahead of yourself. The average last spring frost date for our zone is May 10th. Meaning, unless sowing cool season crops, vegetable transplants and annuals should wait to be transferred outdoors until Mother’s Day or after.

April 13, 2020 – Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Director of the Nebraska Dept. of Agriculture (NDA) issued an Order to aid pesticide applicators whose licenses are up for renewal.

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Virtual Nebraska Crop Management Conference set for January 27

January 22, 2021
The virtual 2021 Nebraska Crop Management Conference will feature research updates and information tailored to Nebraska crop issues and grower interests.

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Upcoming Communicating with Farmers Under Stress webinar workshop to build farmer stress awareness

January 22, 2021
Stress seems to be prevalent in the agriculture sector, with even more concerns arising due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Third annual Nebraska Regional Foods Systems Initiative Food Systems Summit to be virtual

January 14, 2021
The third annual Nebraska Regional Food Systems Summit will take place via Zoom Feb. 8-11.

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2021 western lambing and kidding school Feb. 6 near Bayard

January 13, 2021

Lincoln, Neb. —The 2021 Western Lambing and Kidding School on Saturday, Feb. 6, near Bayard, will feature a farm tour, hands-on demonstrations, and presentations by expert speakers.

The school, sponsored by the Nebraska Sheep & Goat Producers and Nebraska Extension, will run from 9:15 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Julie Kappen Farm, 10803 Rd 89, Bayard, and Bobby Jo’s Branding Iron, 533 Main, Bayard.

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