Local Interest

A research team at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Panhandle Research and Extension Center is developing a method of scheduling irrigation for dry edible beans that uses a sensor to remotely check the temperature of the crop canopy to determine when the crop needs water.

The method, known as infrared radiometry thermometer (IRT), has the potential to be cheaper and easier to install and manage than soil-moisture probes, according to Xin Qiao, Irrigation and Water Management Specialist at the Panhandle Center.

By Jessica Groskopf, Ag Economics Educator, Nebraska Extension

December pre-tax planning meetings are right around the corner, so farmers and ranchers might want to spend a little time at their computers get their Quicken bookkeeping file in order.

It has been a few months since most farmers and ranchers have entered transactions. When inputting several months of entries, anyone is likely to make a few mistakes. Here are tips to tackle two common problems faced when entering transactions into Quicken:  

Missing transactions

Karla H. Jenkins, Cow/Calf and Stocker Management Specialist
Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Recently I attended a high school football game just a few blocks from that community’s local cattle auction. As I watched the players warming up, I hardly noticed the bawling noises made by the calves who had been delivered earlier that day in preparation for the big sale the next day.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists conduct agricultural research at many locations in western Nebraska – the Panhandle Research and Extension Center plots; the Panhandle Research Feedlot; the High Plains Ag Lab near Sidney; and in fields belonging to cooperating farmers.

One of UNL’s lesser-known research laboratories attained a landmark this year. It was 100 years ago, in 1918, that the federal government gave the university an 800-acre piece of rangeland in southern Sioux County to conduct regionally relevant research.

By Gary Stone, Extension Educator, Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Two weedy vines are receiving a lot of attention this year. Both can be found in our shrubs, trees and fences. If left un-managed, they can smother out shrubs and trees by preventing the tree leaves from photosynthesizing and eventually killing them, especially evergreen trees.

By Kelley Rice, Extension Educator and 4-H Coordinator for Panhandle Extension District

A framework is a frame or structure composed of parts fitted and joined together, according to dictionary.com. It is also a good analogy for the way the multi-faceted parts of Nebraska 4-H work together to fulfill its mission to empower youth to reach their full potential working and learning in partnership with caring adults.

At the core of the 4-H framework is Positive Youth Development, which uses the experiential learning model (learning through experience) coupled with positive relationships with caring adults.

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NACEB Honors Award Recipients

February 22, 2024
A Feb. 6 ceremony at the Nebraska Association of County Extension Boards (NACEB) Annual Meeting honored 2023 award recipients for their commitment to supporting and promoting Nebraska Extension.

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Students undertake surgery, flight, and more at Incredible STEM Day

February 8, 2024
Fifth graders flooded the halls of the Panhandle Research Extension and Education Center in Scottsbluff on Feb. 7, when the Nebraska Extension held its second annual Incredible STEM Day.

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Geoscientist uses sensors to assess potential damage in dams

February 8, 2024
Water can be a life-giving source and a destructive one.

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University saluted by Carnegie Foundation for excellence in community engagement

January 11, 2024

“We see the designation as a springboard. It allows us to ramp up in places where we can do better, to bring more public presence to the engagement work that we’re doing, to reward those people who are doing it well and to really enhance our capacity in engagement.”Kathleen Lodl, associate dean of Nebraska Extension

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