Local Interest

By Jeanne Yeoman, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener Volunteer

Summer lawn care: You can have a healthier lawn this summer by following these tips:

Robert M. Harveson, Extension Plant Pathologist   Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Rusts are plant diseases caused by highly diverse pathogenic fungi that can affect many different kinds of plants. Most crops grown in Nebraska can be affected by a rust disease, but fortunately we do not suffer disease problems every year.

Disease incidence and severity are strongly correlated with several major factors, including the severity of the previous winter and temperatures and moisture the following spring.

By Laurie Zitterkopf, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener Volunteer

Bumble bees are declining, and protecting existing habitat and creating and maintaining new habitat are some of the most immediate and productive steps that can be taken to conserve these pollinators. These habitats also support other native pollinators and beneficial insects.

Where populations of pollinators have declined, there is a parallel decline in insect-pollinated plants. Bumble bees and other native pollinators are needed to pollinate our native forbs (flowers). 

Habitat fragmentation, grazing, pesticide use (insecticides and herbicides), and pests and diseases are some of the challenges facing the bumble bees. 

Gary Stone, Jessica Groskopf, and John Thomas, Extension Educators; Dr. Xin Qiao, Extension Water & Irrigation Management Specialist; and David Ostdiek, Extension Communications

July 17 will mark the one-year anniversary of an event that many irrigators in western Nebraska will not forget – the Goshen / Gering-Ft Laramie Irrigation Districts Tunnel No. 2 collapsed, causing a breach in the main canal that dried up water deliveries for irrigators on the south side of the North Platte River under these two districts.

The farmers lost water for 42 days during the critical crop growing time, affecting over 107,000 acres in the North Platte River Valley of Nebraska and Wyoming.

Phragmites is also known as common reed, giant reed and canegrass. Its scientific name is Phragmites australis subsp. australis (non-native) and Phragmites australis subsp. Americanus (native), of the family Poaceae, the grass family.

Soil health advocates say interest is growing in nurturing the health of the vital natural resource. But there’s no standard way to measure soil health or predict its potential for improvement.

Now, a soil scientist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is proposing a name and a concept that could help establish the parameters for measuring baseline soil health and its potential for improvement.

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Virtual Nebraska Crop Management Conference set for January 27

January 22, 2021
The virtual 2021 Nebraska Crop Management Conference will feature research updates and information tailored to Nebraska crop issues and grower interests.

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Upcoming Communicating with Farmers Under Stress webinar workshop to build farmer stress awareness

January 22, 2021
Stress seems to be prevalent in the agriculture sector, with even more concerns arising due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Third annual Nebraska Regional Foods Systems Initiative Food Systems Summit to be virtual

January 14, 2021
The third annual Nebraska Regional Food Systems Summit will take place via Zoom Feb. 8-11.

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2021 western lambing and kidding school Feb. 6 near Bayard

January 13, 2021

Lincoln, Neb. —The 2021 Western Lambing and Kidding School on Saturday, Feb. 6, near Bayard, will feature a farm tour, hands-on demonstrations, and presentations by expert speakers.

The school, sponsored by the Nebraska Sheep & Goat Producers and Nebraska Extension, will run from 9:15 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Julie Kappen Farm, 10803 Rd 89, Bayard, and Bobby Jo’s Branding Iron, 533 Main, Bayard.

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