Local Interest

Robert Wilson, Professor Emeritus
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff

As the North and South Platte Rivers flow through Nebraska they have created rich riparian areas adjacent to the river. Some of these areas have been colonized by invasive weeds, some are used for livestock forage, and many are managed for wildlife.

Landowners have made substantial investments in these properties to control invasive plants. After plant suppression the challenge for land managers is to introduce more desirable plant species that can help restore the land to a more sustainable state. Introducing perennial grasses, legumes and forbs can provide forage for grazing, wildlife and competition with invasive plants. 

By Gary Stone, Extension Educator, Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a concept to identify potential invasive species prior to or just as the invasive is becoming established. An integrated pest management plan can be developed to manage, contain and eradicate the invasive species before it can spread further, avoiding costly, long-term control efforts.

Two invasive grasses, Ventenata and Medusahead, have been identified in parts of Wyoming. Both are slowly spreading east. While neither have been identified in Nebraska, it’s important to be aware of what these grasses look like, how they spread and be ready to deal with them should they show up in Nebraska.

      Are you wondering if the emerald ash borer (EAB) is here, in your yard, perhaps in your community in western Nebraska? Have neighbors or other persons told you it is already here?

      EAB was found in an Omaha park and in Cass County in June 2016. But it has not been confirmed nor identified in western Nebraska by the Nebraska Forest Service or the Nebraska Department of Agriculture. Any reports that EAB is in western Nebraska are not correct, according to Rachel Allison, western forest health specialist with the Nebraska Forest Service.

Karla H. Jenkins, Cow/calf, Range Management Specialist
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff

Any Google search will reveal plenty of articles on how cattle are bad for the environment. Some will say they emit too many greenhouse gases, while others will lament that they compete with humans for food resources. However, consumers may be surprised to learn that cattle are actually able to eat many things that are actually considered waste and are not allowed in the human consumption markets.

Effective January 1, 2017, all livestock producers that use antibiotic medicated feeds to prevent, treat or control animal health issues will be required to get a written order or Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) from a Veterinarian to purchase and feed these feeds.  The regulation will only affect antibiotics administered in feed or water for livestock.

Antibiotics are important to both human medicine and animal health, to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance in both areas; producer must follow the FDA Approved Labels.  These labels determine what animal health issues can be treated with that specific antibiotic, dosage and proper administration.

        If civilization is to survive, we must cultivate the science of human relationships-the ability of all people, of all kinds, to live together, in the same world at peace. – Franklin D. Roosevelt

        The first step to cultivate human relationships starts at home. Children tend to exhibit the behaviors and attitudes that they observe at home.

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