Local Interest

Karla Wilke, Cow/Calf Stocker Management Specialist
Panhandle Research and Extension Center

Temperatures dropping below 15 degrees in early October 2019 may have put some sugarbeets in Western Nebraska at risk of decaying at the crown. When decay begins in the beet before it can be processed, it makes the beet unacceptable for sugar production for human consumption.

Sugarbeets not fit for human consumption can be an economical source of feed for beef cattle. But producers should be aware of how sugarbeet nutrient content compares to other common feeding rations such as corn and beet pulp, and also how the rotting process affects the beets’ nutrient quality.

Nebraska Extension and Educational Service Unit 13 will offer an interactive workshop for child care centers and family home providers, called Go NAP SACC, in November in Scottsbluff.

Go NAP SACC (Go Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care) is a free in-service opportunity for child care providers that takes providers through five simple steps to make changes to their programs to promote healthy child development by supporting healthy eating and physical activity for the children.

The training will take place Nov. 16, 2019 from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Educational Service Unit 13, 4215 Avenue I, Scottsbluff.

Robert M. Harveson, Extension Plant Pathologist
Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff 

Goss’ wilt and leaf blight is a destructive bacterial disease of corn, caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskense. It was first identified in 1969 from Dawson County near Lexington making it a true Nebraska native.

Over the next decade, it was identified from at least 53 other counties in Nebraska and also spread into Iowa, South Dakota, Kansas, and Colorado. The disease was eventually identified from additional U.S. corn-growing states before disappearing in the mid-1980s just as suddenly as it first appeared. 

Jackie Guzman, Extension Educator Scotts Bluff County

How are your children doing?

In recent months our state has experienced several natural disasters with flooding, storms causing hail damage to property and crops, and most recently the collapse of a tunnel in the irrigation canal serving Wyoming and Nebraska farmers impacting thousands of acres of farm land. Anyone who was not directly impacted by a disaster this year probably knows someone who has, teaching us that we are not immune to such events.

These events can cause heightened anxiety and stress in adults. So what are the implications for children?

Nebraska Extension will be offering the ServSafe® Manager Training Program for food service managers and employees November 20-21, 2019 from 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Bluestem Room, 4502 Ave I, Scottsbluff. 

Registrations are due by November 1, 2019. Find the registration form and more information at https://extension.unl.edu/statewide/northernpanhandle/ or contact Nebraska Extension at 308-432-3373 or Jamie Goffena at jgoffena2@unl.edu.

Robert M. Harveson, Extension Plant Pathologist
Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Bacterial wilt of dry beans, caused by Curtobacterium flaccufaciens pv. flaccumfaciens (Cff), has historically posed sporadic but often serious production problems in dry beans throughout the irrigated High Plains since its first report from South Dakota in 1922. In the early 1980s, the disease mysteriously disappeared, appearing only periodically on cull seeds at the processing plants, but with little economic damage.

Local Resources

Local Events

Follow Us on Facebook



Nebraska Extension Scotts Bluff County

Local Events

Search Local & National Extension Resources

Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources News

Latest from ianrnews.unl.edu

Four Rural Prosperity Nebraska Extension Educators Among New Cohort of Fellows for the Center for Great Plains Studies

January 26, 2023
The Center for Great Plains Studies has welcomed 15 new Great Plains Fellows into their ranks.

Read more

Soil Health Conference Set for Feb. 9 at Eastern Nebraska Research, Extension and Education Center

January 23, 2023
Registration is open for the 2023 Eastern Nebraska Soil Health Conference (formerly Nebraska Cover Crop Conference). The conference will take place on Thursday, Feb. 9 at the Eastern Nebraska Research, Extension and Education Center near Mead.

Read more

2023 Dry Edible Bean Day set for Feb. 7, Gering Civic Center

January 22, 2023
The 2023 Nebraska Dry Edible Bean Day will be an in-person event this February, featuring the Nebraska Dry Bean Growers Association’s annual meeting and updates on bean-related research in Nebraska.

Read more

AMPLIFY Engagement Conference registration open to UNL faculty, staff and students

January 20, 2023
Registration is now open for Nebraska Extension’s second annual AMPLIFY Engagement Conference.

Read more