Local Interest

Scotch thistle (also known as Cotton thistle, Heraldic thistle, Scotch cotton thistle (Onopordum acanthium L.), introduced into the United States from Eurasia as an ornamental plant in the 1800s, is a non-native biennial forb from the sunflower family, but it can behave as an annual or short-lived perennial.
The Nebraska Environmental Trust has approved a grant to construct a subsurface drip irrigation system that will used effluent from the UNL Panhandle Research Feedlot to water crops on plots near the feedlot. The irrigation system is under construction at the Mitchell Agricultural Laboratory 5 miles north of the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, where the feedlot and various crop research plots are located, according to Xin Qiao, irrigation and water management specialist, the principal investigator on the project.

By Gary Stone, Extension Educator, Panhandle Extension District

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a concept to identify potentially invasive species prior to or just as the establishment of the invasive is taking place.  An Integrated Pest Management plan (IPM) can be developed to manage, contain and eradicate the invasive species before it can spread further.  This will avoid costly, long-term control efforts.

The devastation Nebraska has experienced these past few months is unimaginable. Communities and people’s lives have changed forever. Though not the highest priority, one item that should be addressed in the near future is the chance that invasive plants may show up in areas that have never had them before.

Nebraska Extension will be offering the ServSafe® Manager Training Program for food service managers and employees May 29-30, 2019 from 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Bluestem Room, 4502 Ave I, Scottsbluff. 

Registrations are due by May 10, 2019. Find the registration form and more information at https://extension.unl.edu/statewide/northernpanhandle/ or contact Nebraska Extension at 308-432-3373 or Jamie Goffena at jgoffena2@unl.edu.

By Dave Ostdiek, Communications Associate
UNL Panhandle Research and Extension Center

As a growing population competes for available freshwater supplies, depletion of groundwater aquifers will be a growing challenge to water policy managers in the United States. Adopting policies to address this issue is a matter of understanding the causes and the local hydrology, then choosing a policy that fits water-management goals.

These are some of the lessons that emerge from a recent issue paper published by a national science policy group. The paper is based partly on experience and expertise from western Nebraska. It highlights a case study of what happened in the Panhandle when over-development caused aquifer depletion along a stream.

The High Plains Ranch Practicum, an in-depth ranch management school in its 13th year, is being offered beginning in June 2019 and concluding in October.

This national award-winning livestock program is hosted jointly by the Nebraska Extension and the University of Wyoming Extension.

The course will focus on providing ranchers tools to understand and integrate four areas of ranch management: range and forage resources; integrating nutrition and reproduction; cost-of-production analysis; and family working relationships.

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Perdue town hall, pep rally, exhibits highlight N150 celebrations at state fair
Aug 16 – Visitors to the Nebraska State Fair, Aug. 23 through Sept. 2 in Grand Island, will have several opportunities to celebrate the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s 150-year legacy of improving the quality of life for Nebraska and beyond. Read more
Poll offers insight on rural Nebraskans’ views of immigration
Aug 14 – While rural Nebraskans have mixed opinions about the impact of immigration on rural Nebraska, those more likely to have lived alongside recent immigrants have more positive views, according to the 2019 Nebraska Rural Poll. Read more