Local Interest

Field bindweed is also known as small bindweed, European bindweed, and Creeping Jenny. Its scientific name is Convolvulus arvensis L, of the family Convolvulaceae (Morning glory family).

By Jill A. Goedeken, Nebraska Extension 4-H Youth Development

While connecting in person may not be possible right now, maintaining positive social connections for youth is important for supporting their social and emotional well-being. These connections are critically important for all youth – those who appear to be doing okay with these uncertain times and for those who may be struggling. Certainly, everyone is experiencing the sudden disruptions in routines and being with friends.

During stressful times, the role of a caring adult is certainly important. Examples of caring adults include parents, extended family members, teachers, coaches, neighbors, and other mentors youth regularly interact with such as youth group leaders, 4-H club leaders, etc.

With virtual-learning, social distancing, and a long list of cancelled beloved pastimes, life can feel pretty far from what we once knew. Change is hard. Yet, amidst a time of uncertainty and change we are searching to find a new normal. A sense of stability, routine, and familiarity are important for youth. Parents, care-providers, and youth development professionals can help youth plan their day to reestablish routine. Having a daily routine enables youth to have some control and choice in their life which is important for their well-being.

By Dr. Michelle Krehbiel, Nebraska Extension 4-H Youth Development

“I don’t like this!”

Children or youth might say this during a heated game, when being asked to correct unwanted behavior or when plans change. Young people who were looking forward to milestones like field days, end of school year celebrations, prom, or graduation, have reason to believe that life can be sad, frustrating, and difficult. How can nurturing adults help young people cope with these emotions and equip them with the skills they need to be caring, connected, and capable adults?

Here is the weekly crop of Master Gardener tips from Nebraska Extension in the Panhandle. These tips are relevant to local lawn and garden issues in the High Plains and follow research-based recommendations. This week’s tips come from Britni Schmaltz, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener Volunteer.

Planting dates: Have you caught spring fever? Each winter, most gardeners eagerly look forward to getting back in the garden and sprucing up their landscape. Don’t get too ahead of yourself. The average last spring frost date for our zone is May 10th. Meaning, unless sowing cool season crops, vegetable transplants and annuals should wait to be transferred outdoors until Mother’s Day or after.

Robert M. Harveson, Extension Plant Pathologist Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

In a March article, I initiated the proposal that two major factors were responsible for the United States to consider producing and utilizing domestic sugarbeet seed rather than depending upon Europe as the seed source.

I hypothesized that the first factor was the first World War. Seeds were generally unavailable between 1914 and 1918 because the majority of the seeds previously used came from war-ravaged France and Germany.

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Communicating with Farmers Under Stress Program set for August 16

August 2, 2022
Stress seems to be prevalent in the agriculture sector, especially in areas where natural disasters or wildfires have occurred.

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The North Platte River – Multiuse Water

August 2, 2022
This will be a six-part part series on the dams, reservoirs, power generation and some diversion dams located on the North Platte River.

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UpStarts extension program aims to support entrepreneurship and social connectedness among youth in rural communities

August 2, 2022
At the Sun Theatre in downtown Holdrege, two teams of high school students presented potential solutions for a problem their community is currently facing: population decline.

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4Rs Nutrient Stewardship Field Day featured nutrient management and water quality research

August 2, 2022
The University of Nebraska–Lincoln 2022 4Rs Nutrient Stewardship Field Day at the Eastern Nebraska Research, Extension and Education Center on July 19 featured knowledge and tools on improving nutrient management and water quality through research and demonstrations.

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