Local Interest

Dave Ostdiek, Communications Associate
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff

Four high-school students from Scottsbluff and Bayard are spending their summers teaching elementary students, and in the process learning a few things themselves.

They are participants in the Teens as Teachers program, sponsored by Nebraska Extension and in its third year in Scotts Bluff, second year in Morrill, and a handful of other counties in Nebraska.

Karla Wilke Cow/Calf, Stocker Management Specialist
Panhandle Research and Extension Center

The July 17, 2019 breach of the Gering-Fort Laramie canal left over 100,000 acres of irrigated crops in eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska without water. Without irrigation water and adequate rainfall, taking the corn to full maturity and grain production may not be the best option for the crop.

Producers with a corn crop impacted by the canal breach may want to consider making corn silage out of this year’s crop. There are several things to consider when making the decision to make silage.

Rural Stress

Stress has become a fact of life for farm families. A number of factors are behind this: low commodity prices; shifting international trade outlook; and damage and obstacles created by storms, floods, and other natural disasters. There’s added stress this summer in Scotts Bluff and Goshen counties from the loss of irrigation water to more than 100,000 acres of crops due to the collapse of the Fort Laramie Canal tunnel. But there are resources to help farm families address problems caused by stress.

Susan Harris-Broomfield, Nebraska Extension Educator, Rural Health, Wellness, & Safety

Robert M. Harveson, Extension Plant Pathologist
Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Symptoms of Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) have been observed in a sugar beet field near Scottsbluff, a signal that farmers should begin scouting fields for signs of this potentially destructive disease.

Cercospora leaf spot has long been problematic to sugar beet production throughout the eastern and Great lakes production areas of the United States. In western Nebraska, it has been sporadic, but not a consistent issue. However, when it does occur, it can be very destructive.

A recent study into how pinto beans help lower cholesterol was a collaborative effort among several departments at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that spanned the state from west to east.

Results of the study are reported in the June issue of the Journal of Nutrition (JN), a publication of the American Society for Nutrition. JN has drawn attention to the journal article by featuring it in a news release distributed universally on the World Wide Web.

The difference between a good farmer and a great manager often comes down to knowing the true financial position of a farm. Good records make it possible to track an operation’s true financial position. Inaccurate records can lead to misguided management decisions.

A “Good Farmer to Great Manager” record-keeping class, designed to teach farmers and ranchers to keep accurate records for their operations, will be held July 25-26, 2019 at the Prairie Winds Community Center (428 N Main St) in Bridgeport. It will run from 1-5 p.m. the first day, and 8 a.m. until noon the second day.

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Panhandle Perspectives: Teen teacher for elementary students

July 13, 2020
Cassandra Rodriguez, a senior-to-be at Scottsbluff High School, is expanding her horizons this summer in the Teens as Teachers program at the Scotts Bluff County Extension office.

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Nebraska State Fair to focus on youth development, including 4-H events

June 30, 2020
Nebraska 4-H events will be front and center at the 2020 Nebraska State Fair.

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