Local Interest

The peppers were harvested weeks ago from a small research plot at the Panhandle Center where a type of fabric mulch is being tested for potential use in USDA certified organic produce fields.

During the off season, researchers are checking to see what becomes of the biodegradable mulch, an experimental product from 3M that is being tested to see if it is suitable for USDA-certified organic vegetable production.

Last spring, six rows of peppers were planted through 3-foot-wide strips of mulch. Two different types of mulch, one black and the other white, are being tested. Recently, workers were busy in the plot setting up six different treatment regimens for the harvested plots, to see if the fabric mulch will disintegrate differently under different conditions.

      Ranchers who want to reduce calf loss at calving and to learn how to properly assist cows at calving should plan to attend “Assisting the Beef Cow at Calving” programs at six locations in December, with Dr. Robert Mortimer, a nationally known veterinarian from Colorado State University.

      Dr. Mortimer will discuss handling calving difficulty, with emphasis on decision making and the hows and whys of techniques for providing assistance.

      Dr. Mortimer developed a program strongly emphasizing hands-on experience in calving management and produced a video with Elanco and Beef Today on “How to Save More Calves at Calving.”

Jim Schild and Gary Stone, Extension Educators, Scotts Bluff County

The single biggest use of water in the average western Nebraska household is irrigating the Kentucky bluegrass lawn.

But there are two alternative turfs that allow homeowners to manage water more efficiently: tall fescue, a cool-season grass, and buffalograss, a warm-season grass. Each has advantages and disadvantages.

Tall fescue can use more water than bluegrass, but its advantage is a deep, extensive root system, which can extend as deep as 2 ½ to 3 feet in western Nebraska soils. The effective rooting depth for Kentucky bluegrass is 6 to 8 inches.

By Jim Schild and Gary Stone, Extension Educators, UNL Panhandle Research and Extension Center

Fertilizing a turf grass lawn is a lot more than just buying a bag of fertilizer and spreading it all in the spring.

There are several decisions to make. One is how much fertilizer to apply; another is when to apply it. And spring is not the best time to apply most of the year's fertilizer.

The goal of a good fertilizer program is to keep growth at a minimum while maintaining a good, thick, dense, well-colored lawn. To reach the goal, at least two-thirds of the fertilizer should be applied during the fall to thicken the turf and help the grass recover after the summer stress.

Jackie Guzman, Extension Educator
Scotts Bluff County

Now that children are home from school on summer break, parents can spend the next three months just keeping them busy, or else they can seize an opportunity to build a stronger family and maybe create new traditions.

Many families have their own traditions. As long as I can remember, every December my family’s tradition has been to make tamales together – a very labor intensive process.  Regardless, we all look forward to our annual family gathering.

        If civilization is to survive, we must cultivate the science of human relationships-the ability of all people, of all kinds, to live together, in the same world at peace. – Franklin D. Roosevelt

        The first step to cultivate human relationships starts at home. Children tend to exhibit the behaviors and attitudes that they observe at home.

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Faculty Spotlight: Leslie Johnson

September 13, 2021
Meet Leslie Johnson, Nebraska Extension educator in the area of animal manure management.

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Dry edible bean harvest underway in the Panhandle

September 13, 2021
This season's dry edible bean harvest in underway in the tre0state region of the Nebraska Panhandle, southwest Nebraska, eastern Wyoming, and northeastern Colorado. The overall crop in the region looks very good, despite severe weather and some hail earlier in the year across the growing region. Average yield is expected to be around 2,400 pounds or approximately 40 bushels per acre.

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Returning to the Farm workshop set for Dec. 10, 11

September 8, 2021

Lincoln, Neb. —The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Center for Agricultural Profitability and Nebraska Extension will present Returning to the Farm, and workshop series for families who are in the transition process of bringing members back to the farm. It will begin with a two-day workshop for multi-generational families on Dec. 10 and 11 in Columbus.  

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Backyard Farmer to film season finale with live audience Sept. 1

September 2, 2021

Lincoln, Neb. —The Backyard Farmer panel will hold a Q&A session with a live audience Sept. 1 beginning at 5 p.m. in the Backyard Farmer Garden on the UNiversity of Nebraska-Lincoln East Campus. The session will last for about 45 minutes before the filming of the Backyard Farmer season finale. Chairs will be available for the live audience. 

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