Local Interest

Dry edible beans such as pintos, great northern, and black beans are a very valuable commodity raised in western Nebraska and eastern Wyoming, ranking Nebraska second, and Wyoming eighth in national dry bean production. However, hail and drought can easily reduce bean quality and the feasibility of harvest for the rigorous human consumption standards. So the question becomes, when dry edible beans are not suitable for human consumption, what options are available?

By Gary Stone, Extension Educator, Panhandle R&E Center, Scottsbluff

Nebraska Extension has been receiving many calls this summer about two weedy vines that have been found in shrubs, trees and fences. If left un-managed, they can smother out shrubs and trees by preventing the tree leaves from photosynthesizing and eventually killing them, especially evergreen trees.

The first is Wild cucumber (Echinocystis lobata), also known as balsam apple or mock cucumber.  Wild cucumber is a native plant, an annual with a shallow root system that reproduces by seed. The vines are bright light green in color and will attach and climb on anything they can.

A recent study into how pinto beans help lower cholesterol was a collaborative effort among several departments at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that spanned the state from west to east.

Results of the study are reported in the June issue of the Journal of Nutrition (JN), a publication of the American Society for Nutrition. JN has drawn attention to the journal article by featuring it in a news release distributed universally on the World Wide Web.

By Aaron Berger
Nebraska Beef Extension Educator

For agricultural producers committed to lifelong learning, podcasts are a good way to expand their knowledge base while using time effectively.

Most people involved in production ag spend a significant amount of time behind the wheel of a vehicle or piece of equipment. This “drive time” can be an opportunity to listen to podcasts on their smartphones.

David Lott, Horticulture Extension Educator, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension in North Platte

Storms inflict significant damage to gardens and landscapes across Nebraska each year. Initial reactions to storm damage can be overwhelming when trying to decide what steps to take to start the recovery process. Here are some simple tips to help find a place to start in the recovery process to reduce further damage to the landscape and anyone who is helping in the process.

The Nebraska Department of Agriculture and Nebraska Extension are encouraging produce vendors, nurseries, beekeepers, organic growers and other businesses that could be affected by chemical drift to avoid inadvertent drift by registering their specialty crops and beehives on-line with DriftWatch/Beecheck website.

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University saluted by Carnegie Foundation for excellence in community engagement

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“We see the designation as a springboard. It allows us to ramp up in places where we can do better, to bring more public presence to the engagement work that we’re doing, to reward those people who are doing it well and to really enhance our capacity in engagement.”Kathleen Lodl, associate dean of Nebraska Extension

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