Local Interest

The peppers were harvested weeks ago from a small research plot at the Panhandle Center where a type of fabric mulch is being tested for potential use in USDA certified organic produce fields.

During the off season, researchers are checking to see what becomes of the biodegradable mulch, an experimental product from 3M that is being tested to see if it is suitable for USDA-certified organic vegetable production.

Last spring, six rows of peppers were planted through 3-foot-wide strips of mulch. Two different types of mulch, one black and the other white, are being tested. Recently, workers were busy in the plot setting up six different treatment regimens for the harvested plots, to see if the fabric mulch will disintegrate differently under different conditions.

Crop Production Clinics at Gering and other locations across Nebraska in January 2018 sponsored by Nebraska Extension will provide valuable information to help crop producers and agribusiness professionals improve their profitability and sustainability.

The clinics are also an opportunity for pesticide applicators to renew their licenses in several categories, including commercial and noncommercial ag plant (01) and demonstration/research (D/R). Private pesticide applicators also can renew their licenses. Extension Educator Gary Stone strongly recommends that anyone who needs to renew a pesticide applicator license take advantage of this early opportunity to do so.

When commodity prices go down, it’s important to keep financial books on the ranch for more than just tax time.

Nebraska Extension Educators will teach how to use Quicken, a popular commercial record-keeping package that is user friendly, inexpensive and easy to find, in two upcoming workshops in Scottsbluff. Quicken is flexible for ag and non-ag business enterprises and separates out family living expenses.

These workshops are limited to 10 participants. The cost is $20 per participant. Dates and locations:

Scottsbluff, Dec. 20, 2017: 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center. To register call Jessica Groskopf 308-632-1247.

The basics of QuickBooks financial software for farmers and ranchers will be taught in a workshop Dec. 15, 2017 at Scottsbluff. The workshop will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To register call Jessica Groskopf at 308-632-1247. Jerry Terwilliger of the Center for Rural Affairs teaches the basics of desktop QuickBooks, focusing on the record-keeping needs of farmers and ranchers. Participants will learn how to input transactions, use accounts, categories, inventories, invoices, and run common reports. Cost is $55 per participant, and the classes are limited to five participants per location.

      Ranchers who want to reduce calf loss at calving and to learn how to properly assist cows at calving should plan to attend “Assisting the Beef Cow at Calving” programs at six locations in December, with Dr. Robert Mortimer, a nationally known veterinarian from Colorado State University.

      Dr. Mortimer will discuss handling calving difficulty, with emphasis on decision making and the hows and whys of techniques for providing assistance.

      Dr. Mortimer developed a program strongly emphasizing hands-on experience in calving management and produced a video with Elanco and Beef Today on “How to Save More Calves at Calving.”

Jim Schild and Gary Stone, Extension Educators, Scotts Bluff County

The single biggest use of water in the average western Nebraska household is irrigating the Kentucky bluegrass lawn.

But there are two alternative turfs that allow homeowners to manage water more efficiently: tall fescue, a cool-season grass, and buffalograss, a warm-season grass. Each has advantages and disadvantages.

Tall fescue can use more water than bluegrass, but its advantage is a deep, extensive root system, which can extend as deep as 2 ½ to 3 feet in western Nebraska soils. The effective rooting depth for Kentucky bluegrass is 6 to 8 inches.

Pages



Nebraska Extension in Morrill County

Local Events

Search Local & National Extension Resources

Panhandle Perspectives: Did you know? The first domestic sugarbeet seeds were produced in Nebraska

March 26, 2020
At the turn of the 20th century, the sugarbeet was one of the few American crops with an almost complete dependence upon Europe as a source of seed each season. The vast majority of all seed used in sugar beet production originated in either Germany or France. It took two primary factors before Americans were convinced that a domestic seed industry was needed.

Read more

Combatting cabin fever: Extension builds out educational content

March 24, 2020
For many families across the state, cabin fever may be setting in, and Nebraska Extension is working to help alleviate pent-up energy with fun, educational content for all ages.

Read more