Local Interest

By Jeanne Yeoman, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

By Jeanne Murray, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Are you planning to can some of your garden produce? 

Garden produce can be preserved by two canning methods, the water-bath or the pressure canner. Water-bath canning is for produce with high acidity, like pickles, most fruits, sauerkraut, tomatoes, jams and jellies. The pressure canner is used for low-acid foods, like vegetables, meats, sea foods and salsas without added acid. Improperly canned produce may result in a deadly food poisoning.

Do you need to adjust your canning time or pressure for high altitude, or can you use the recipe as printed? 

By Elaine Pile, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Drought Tolerant Plants

As we once again are experiencing drought this year, we need to consider drought tolerant plants. These plants will persist for three or more years with little or no supplemental watering, and help conserve water, reduce water maintenance and still provide multi-season color and interest. They do best in full sun and well-drained soil. Areas that are difficult to water or are subject to reflected heat and light are good locations for drought-tolerant perennials. 

The Panhandle Research and Extension Center is pleased to announce the recipients for its first annual “Panhandle Research and Extension Center Student Scholarship.”

Laura Albro from Bayard, Faith Miller from Mullen and Braelyn Shrewsbury from Alliance were all awarded $1000. Each was asked to send a brief bio and what this scholarship was going to help them achieve.

Laura Albro

The Kendrick Project – Seminoe & Alcova

By Gary Stone, Nebraska Extension Water & Integrated Cropping Systems Educator

The first dam and reservoir on the North Platte River after it enters from Colorado is Seminoe. Seminoe dam is part of the Kendrick Project intended to generate hydropower and expand irrigation in central Wyoming. The project, called the Casper-Alcova Project, was authorized in 1933 under the National Recovery Act during the Great Depression. The project was renamed the Kendrick Project in 1937. The Kendrick Project also includes the Alcova dam, reservoir, and the Casper-Alcova Canal. 

By Leann Sato, Nebraska Extension Master Gardener

Lawn Down and Brown?

That’s okay, let it rest. Grass protects itself from scorching heat by going dormant. Let it rest during summer’s heat and revive when Fall’s cooler temperatures arrive. A half inch of water about every two to three weeks will keep the crowns and roots healthy. Native, drought-resistant grass varieties, like buffalo and blue grama, will require less water during dormancy than cool season grasses. Save water and let the lawn rest until Fall.

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