Local Interest

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

 Kicking back to consider next year’s garden, let benefitting pollinators be one of your considerations.  Of course pollination is important to us because we like to eat—one-third of our food supply exists because pollinators pollinate.  Pollinators, specifically native bees, are real work horses of the pollination world—just 250 native bees do the work of thousands of honey bees.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

As flowering plants give way to autumn, it’s the fruit that many produce that add interest to our landscapes.  It’s hard to beat the berries produced by purple beautyberry, Callicarpa dichotoma. At a time of the year when fruits highlight the reds, yellows and golds of autumn, it’s nice to see the show-stopping lustrous purple-violet fruits of beautyberry.  The fruits are small, just 1/8 of an inch across, but the numerous clusters along the stem make it a standout. 

Beautyberry should not be confused with beautybush, which is an entirely different plant with a whole other set of flowering and fruiting characteristics.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County

If you’ve grown garlic before, you know that the cloves for planting are found readily in the spring.  What many do not know is that fall planted garlic produces larger cloves than spring-planted ones.  Using this opportunity to plant now means it’s not too late to reap the benefits of fall-planted garlic.

In selecting a site to grow garlic, choose one that gets 6 or more hours of direct uninterrupted sunlight daily and has a well-draining soil.  In dense soils, garlic can rot, so amending the soil with compost first ensures a good crop. Garlic needs a nutrient-rich soil, so sandy soils will also benefit from the addition of compost.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

The brown marmorated stink bug is a nuisance as well as a destructive pest and, like its name implies, puts off a nasty odor when crushed. This nonnative invasive pest has been in Nebraska since 2012. The damage the BMSB causes is from its needle-like mouthpart that punctures, resulting in sunken bruised areas on fruits. It feeds on a wide range of crops, including soybeans, corn, apple, pear, peach, cherry, peppers, tomato, maple, redbud and serviceberry, to name a few.

The BMSB is characterized by bands of white on dark antennae and white inverted V-shapes along the edge of their body. The insect itself is shaped like a shield and is about ½ inch long.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

 In the midst of September, if weed management isn’t on your autumn to-do list, it definitely should be. Fall is the best time to be applying herbicides to perennial weeds. Why is this so? As plants ready for winter, sugars produced in leaves are transported to the roots for storage.  With herbicide applications, the plant’s internal transport allows herbicides to move readily from leaves to roots, providing for excellent distribution and better control.

By Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator

The first and most important thing to know is that Fall IS for planting!  Warm soils, cooler temperatures and less weed pressure make it a perfect time to plant regardless if you’re planting trees, shrubs, perennials or Kentucky bluegrass. 

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Partnership creates biodefense lab focused on food security

May 14, 2021
The University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska will begin a five-year partnership to help safeguard the U.S. food supply.

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Applying manure management concepts on-farm

May 12, 2021
Nebraska Extension’s Land Application Recertification sessions, called Applying Manure Management Concepts On-Farm, are scheduled to be in-person at many locations across the state in June, with the first taking place in May in Lexington.

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Rural Prosperity Nebraska receives boost from CARES Act

May 12, 2021
—The University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Rural Prosperity Nebraska initiative, along with six Nebraska economic development and Chamber of Commerce organizations, has received more than $400,000 in funding through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, administered by the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) to help businesses and communities respond to coronavirus.

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Tailgate Talks celebrates its first anniversary during Beef Month

May 12, 2021

Lincoln, Neb. —May is National Beef Month, and Nebraska Extension is celebrating the first anniversary of Tailgate Talks, a YouTube channel aimed at beef producers.  

 As part of the celebration, there will be a featured video message on the Tailgate Talks channel and a giveaway to its subscribers to commemorate the channel’s success and emphasize the importance of the beef industry in Nebraska, home to the top three beef cow counties in the U.S. — Cherry, Custer and Holt Counties. 

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