Local Interest

Nebraska Extension is fully committed to the health and well-being of Nebraskans. In a disease situation like COVID-19, the principle of social distancing is one of the main methods that can be used to help reduce the spread of the disease.

Garden Update
Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension in Dodge County

This is the time of year when fungi become the topic of conversation. What most people find alarming is the speed with which conks, mushrooms, and puffballs develop. In some cases, it is literally overnight. What is visible are the sporulating structures—the part of fungi that produces the next generation.  A good way to think of this is plants make seeds to produce the next generation, fungi produce spores. These spore-producing structures are varied and fascinating, and most people who ask about them are wanting to eat them.

Garden Update
Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County

It is not unusual for some plants to blossom out of season.  Magnolia, crabapple, lilac, and forsythia are notably spring-blooming plants, but stressful growing conditions can instigate a type of dormancy that pushes flowering to later in the season. Lilacs are a great example this year. 

Garden Update
Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County

As harvest from the vegetable garden draws to a close, it is time to plan and take steps to protect the soil for the winter months ahead. This ensures the soil is in good shape and ready for next year’s garden. After all, soil isn’t just dirt, but a rich and varied composition of minerals and plant nutrients, organic matter, beneficial microorganisms, and humic acid.  It is not only foundational, with spaces for roots to grow and anchor plants, but also serving up a nourishing “stew” for seed germination, plant growth and vegetable production.

Garden Update
Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County 

Confusion surrounds the healthiest way to stake newly-planted trees to stand up to fierce winds while fostering good root growth. The old method, seen much too often still, of snaking wire through a section of garden hose to wrap around trunks and branches is highly injurious to trees. This ill-advised technique digs into tree conductive tissues and, left in place too long, shuts down sugar transport from the leaves to the roots. Roots then become starved of sugars necessary for certain functions, like existing. 

Garden Update
Kathleen Cue, Nebraska Extension Horticulture Educator in Dodge County

Pages



Nebraska Extension in Dodge County

Local Events

Events display below in Central Daylight Time (CDT)

Search Local & National Extension Resources

Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources News

Latest from ianrnews.unl.edu

Bruns reappointed as West Central Research and Extension Center director

October 13, 2021
Kelly Bruns has been reappointed to the role of director of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s West Central Research, Extension and Education Center (WCREEC) in North Platte. The reappointment is for a five-year term.

Read more

Faculty Spotlight: Brian Cox

October 11, 2021
Meet Brian Cox, engagement zone coordinator for Nebraska Extension.

Read more

Panhandle Perspectives: Panhandle Learning Agricultural Network (PLAN) aims to increase farmer adoption of field-based sensors

October 7, 2021
Nowadays, farmers have more access than ever to data of all kinds about their crops, thanks to rapid development of sensor and telemetry techniques over the past few decades. Yet the adoption rate of sensors for farming operations is still low, possibly due to cost, comfortability of adapting to sensor-based management, concerns on return on investment, and other reasons.

Read more

FarmBits podcast launches new season Oct. 7

October 4, 2021
The FarmBits podcast will return to airwaves beginning Oct. 7, with the release of new episodes. FarmBits has a new team of hosts and a refreshed structure that will add variety to the podcast.

Read more