Local Interest

   The main economic driver of a cow-calf operation is dependent on the number of calves weaned alive. The next two drivers are weight and phenotype. For these reasons, outstanding calf health is a directly correlated variable to calf growth and performance. The following guide will review management strategies that are associated with excellent newborn calf health.

The best time to seed cool season grasses, such as Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue, is between August 15th and September 15th, so its time to start your site preparation.

Getting your seeding done as early as possible is really important, because each week of delay in seeding translates into 2-4 additional weeks required for the grass to mature in fall. It is critical to seed tall fescue no later than mid-September.  Tall fescue seedlings take a longer time to develop cold hardiness, so get your seeding done early.

Winter Dieback of Trees and Shrubs

A recent discussion thread launched on the Shady Lane listserv by Justin Evertson of the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum asked observers how trees in their landscapes weathered the negative double-digit cold of winter. Used to extreme cold conditions, native trees and shrubs weathered the tough winter best. Others (that were thought to be very cold hardy) lost all living canopy growth and are now sending out sprouts at the base. Still others are no surprise at all, such as the Japanese maple, a marginal species for this region at best, which had major dieback and/or outright death.

Understanding the How and Use of NASS Cattle Reports
Thursday, April 29, noon

With: Nick Streff, USDA NASS, and Elliott Dennis, UNL Agricultural Economics

Nick Streff is the Director of the USDA NASS Northern Plains Regional Field Office in Lincoln NE. Nick oversees data collection, analysis and publication of NASS estimates for the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas. Prior to moving to Nebraska, Nick was the hogs and pigs statistician for USDA NASS. Nick will be taking us through an in depth look at the NASS cattle reports.

Registration is open at https://farm.unl.edu/webinars

Ag Econ’s Farm and Ranch Management webinar series will close out the month with a session on winter wheat this week, followed by an overview of NASS Cattle Reports next Thursday.  

Registration is open at https://farm.unl.edu/webinars

The Economic Viability of Winter Wheat
Thursday, April 22, noon

With: Cody Creech, Dryland Systems Cropping Specialist, Nebraska Extension; Dave Petersen, Area Claims Manager, Rural Community Insurance Services; and Cory Walters, Associate Professor and Grain Economist, UNL Agricultural Economics.

Local Resources

Local Events

Follow Us on Facebook



Nebraska Extension in Otoe County

Local Events

Search Local & National Extension Resources

Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources News

Latest from ianrnews.unl.edu

Summer course for Part 107 Remote Pilot Exam Prep offered in Scottsbluff

May 30, 2024
Nebraska Extension will offer one-day (eight-hour) courses across the state to prepare individuals to pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Knowledge Exam required to receive a Part 107 remote pilot certification or license to fly drones for commercial applications.

Read more

2024 Nebraska Soil Health School has successful launch

May 9, 2024
The first installment of a planned 2024 Nebraska Soil Health School series was held on April 24 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln High Plains Ag Lab in Sidney, Neb. The event addressed the semi-arid Panhandle climate and potential management practices for soil health and had over 60 attendees.

Read more

Building Bridges in Conservation: Nebraska hosts inaugural natural resources workshop

April 15, 2024
Overlooking the iconic Platte River, over 100 natural resource professionals and students met to build and foster new collaborations at the first Natural Resources Conservation Connecting Points Workshop.

Read more

Engaging Agriculture: Embryology a classroom springtime favorite

April 1, 2024
Spring is here, and Nebraska elementary students are busy learning about embryology.

Read more