Nebraska is nationally known as the Beef State. Our team provides research-based information and resources to beef producers to help them provide an economical, safe, quality product to consumers while protecting and preserving Nebraska's vast natural resources.

Active in all 93 counties and at beef.unl.edu

Beef Systems

UNL Rural Stress and Family Wellness work group has collected resources for farmers and ranchers to address stress and suicide prevention in Nebraska.  

This summer, Nebraska Extension is hosting series of pasture walks across northeast Nebraska the 3rd Tuesday of the month, June – September. The first event will be held June 18th at 4:00 PM at the Dave Hansen ranch, 51193 875 Rd. Orchard, NE. Dave will provide a tour of his cow/calf and grass finished operation as well as sharing his personal grazing approach. 

By: Amy Timmerman – Extension Educator and Jim Jansen – Extension Educator

There are many things on our checklist as we recover from these historic floods and blizzards from the past several day.  As we move forward, producers need to know the basics of the Livestock Indemnity Program and how this program may provide financial assistance to help cover livestock losses.  Below is a brief description of the livestock indemnity program but as the steps you need to take to make a claim with the USDA-Farm Service Agency (FSA).

Summer in Nebraska is usually characterized by warm sunny days that fuel thunderstorms popping up in the afternoon and evening hours.  Heavy rain, hail, and damaging winds are no stranger to us.  This year in the northern part of the state however it seems like the heavy rain has gotten a bit carried away.  While a bit of excess moisture is always welcome, the continual deluge this summer has left low lying hay ground flooded, fields hailed out, and producers scrambling to put up they hay they can get to in the narrow window between storms.  

Market gurus say to make profits you must buy low and sell high.  What market gives you that opportunity today?  The stock market?  No, it's the hay market!

High rainfall in many areas produced high yields of both grass and alfalfa hay this year.  Add to that the high carryover from last year plus lots of crop residues available and you get an abundance of forage for this winter. And when winter forage is abundant, hay prices go down.

Summer weather can cause hay to be baled too wet or silage chopped too dry.  Now that hay and silage has heated and turned brown.  How should you feed these forages? 

Hay baled too wet or silage chopped to dry can get excessively hot and cause certain chemical reactions to occur.  These chemical reactions and the heat that produces them will darken your forage and make it smell sweet like caramel.