Mitchell B. Stephenson Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Range and Forage Specialist

University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Panhandle Research and Extension Center

4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE 69361

Email: mstephenson@unl.edu

Phone: (308) -632-1355

ACADEMIC TRAINING

  • Ph.D., Range Science, New Mexico State University, 2014
  • M.S., Range Science, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2010
  • B.S., Animal Science, Brigham Young University-Idaho, 2008

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Plant-herbivore interactions; grazing methods; timing of grazing; targeted livestock grazing; grazing distribution and livestock behavior; cattle social association patterns; feeding site selection; low-stress herding

EXTENSION INTERESTS:

  • The main focus of my Extension activities is to develop, implement, and support range and forage management trainings, workshops, and programs for youth and adults in the UNL Panhandle Extension District.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

  • Range and Forage Management Specialist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Panhandle Research and Extension Center. 2015 - Present
  • Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Nevada, Reno - Reno, NV. 2014-2015
  • Rangeland Ecologist, Conservation Research Center - Jackson, WY. 2010-2011

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

  • Stephenson, M. B., D. W. Bailey, and D. Jensen. 2015. Association patterns of visually-observed cattle on Montana, USA foothill rangelands. Applied Animal Behavior Science (In Review)
  • Stephenson, M. B., D. W. Bailey, L. D. Howery, and L. A. Varelas. 2015. Efficacy of low-stress herding and low-moisture block to target cattle grazing on New Mexico rangelands. Journal of Arid Environments (In Press)
  • Bruegger, R. A., L. A. Varelas, L. D. Howery, L. A. Torell, M. B. Stephenson, and D. W. Bailey. 2015. Targeted grazing in southern Arizona: Using cattle to reduce fine fuel loads. Rangeland Ecology and Management (In Press).
  • Stephenson, M. B., W. H. Schacht, J. D. Volesky, K. M. Eskridge, and D. Bauer. 2015. Time of grazing effect on subsequent-year standing crop in the eastern Nebraska Sandhills. Rangeland Ecology & Management 68:150-157.
  • Bailey, D. W., S. Lunt, A. Lipka, M. G. Thomas, J. F. Medrano, A. Canovas, G. Rincon, M. B. Stephenson, and D. Jensen. 2015. Genetic influences on cattle grazing distribution: Association of genetic markers with terrain use in cattle. Rangeland Ecology & Management 68:142-149.
  • Bailey, D. W., M. B. Stephenson, and M. Pittarello. 2015. Effect of resource and terrain heterogeneity on feeding site selection and livestock movement patterns. Animal Production Science 55:298-308.
  • Stephenson, M. B., W. H. Schacht, J. D. Volesky, K. M. Eskridge, E. M. Mousel, and D. Bauer. 2013. Grazing method effect on topographical vegetation characteristics and livestock performance in the Nebraska Sandhills. Rangeland Ecology & Management 66:561-569.
  • Bailey, D. W., and M. B. Stephenson. 2013. Integrating stockmanship into rangeland management. Stockmanship Journal 2:1-12.
  • Schacht, W. H., J. D. Volesky, D. E. Bauer, and M. B. Stephenson. 2011. Grazing systems for the Nebraska Sandhills. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Publication. EC127. 14 p.