Cropping & Water Systems

 

Population growth puts a greater stress on expanding yields for food, which still encouraging resource stewardship. To help meet this challenge, we share unbiased, research‐based information for a diversified agricultural audience.

Active in all 93 counties and at extension.unl.edu/croppingwater

Cropping & Water Systems

Ongoing drought conditions are supporting hay and forage prices. While eastern parts of Nebraska had a good first cutting of hay, subsequent cuttings have been less. Areas further west haven't fared so well. Sandhills meadows will likely average less production than last year and yields will be below long term averages. Annual forages harvested for hay will be down as well due to lack of moisture in June and July.

Having a written agreement can help reduce miscommunication and frustration down the road.
• It ensures a better understanding by both parties.
• It serves as a reminder of the terms originally agreed upon.
• It increases the likelihood that the relationship will continue in future years.

When it comes to rental agreements for grazing corn residue, a number of questions need to be asked and answered up front to avoid disagreements later.

               Will you chop corn silage this year?  Do it right and time your harvest correctly.

                High-quality corn silage often is an economical substitute for some of the grain in finishing and in dairy rations.  And corn silage can be an important winter feed for cow-calf producers.  All too often, though, we fail to harvest silage to get its best feed value.

Warmer than normal mid-April temperatures have allowed corn planting to jump ahead of the five-year average (11%) with 17% of acres planted and 1% emerged as of April 23.  Since then farmers in some areas have completed or nearly completed planting. Early-planted corn has emerged in some parts of the state.

While several areas of the state experienced lows below 28°F this week, widespread alfalfa losses are not expected at this time.

If you're concerned about whether your alfalfa may have suffered frost injury, remember that frozen alfalfa usually needs some time to recover before damage can be estimated.

Preliminary findings from the 2017 Nebraska Farm Real Estate Market Survey conducted by the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, indicate that as of February 1, 2017, the weighted average farmland value declined by about 10 percent over the prior 12-month period to $2,805 per acre (Figure 1 and Table 1). This decline marks the third year of consecutive downward pressure totaling to approximately 15 percent for the weighted average farmland value in Nebraska which peaked in 2014 at $3,315 per acre.